SUPPORTED BY 18-270MM

PROFILE

Kenichi Shindo

Kenichi Shindo

Born in Asakusa, Tokyo in 1943, Shindo joined Kyodo News in 1964 and traveled around Japan and overseas as a news photographer. He has captured a wide range of images including the imprisoned Sadamichi Hirasawa who had been convicted of murder in the Teigin Incident, as well as those related to the Dhaka hijacking incident and President Park Chung-hee's assassination. Besides these, he has shot for stories on Vietnam, Afghanistan, the Gulf, the Iraq War, Sudan, and Somalia. Shindo is also a part-time lecturer at Tokyo Polytechnic University and the official photographer for the Japan Committee for UNICEF. His published works include Shashin no Wana (Traps of Photography).

http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100002112169357

GALLERY

click here

After 3/11

  • Removing Debris from the Rice Fields (Rikuzentakata, June 25, 2011)

    Removing Debris from the Rice Fields (Rikuzentakata, June 25, 2011)

  • Tokyo Sky Tree and Construction Crane (July 2011)

    Tokyo Sky Tree and Construction Crane (July 2011)

  • One Pine Tree (Rikuzentakata, June 25, 2011)

    One Pine Tree (Rikuzentakata, June 25, 2011)

  • Restricted Area (Minamisoma, June 19, 2011)

    Restricted Area (Minamisoma, June 19, 2011)

  • Nishitanibo at Chuson-ji, a World Heritage Site (June 26, 2011)

    Nishitanibo at Chuson-ji, a World Heritage Site (June 26, 2011)

MESSAGE

The unprecedented earthquake and tsunami together with the nuclear power plant accident have led to unimaginable circumstances that none of us had ever before experienced. I covered the situation on site and was stunned by the extent of the devastation. I had neither the time nor the emotional reserves to take carefully considered photos. From the moment I entered the disaster area, I felt a certain sense of limitation to my work as a photographer. It is almost impossible to communicate the distress, disorientation, sadness, uncertainty, and fear of the victims, and the sensations felt while there, such as the sounds, smells, heat and cold.

The earthquake bent the tip of Tokyo Tower. Interestingly, soon after that, the Tokyo Sky Tree became the world's tallest tower at 634 meters. On June 26, the Historic Monuments and Sites of Hiraizumi were registered as a World Heritage Site. This site is located in Hiraizumi of Iwate Prefecture where many people of the Heian period led their lives, and encompasses Chuson-ji temple precincts and the Konjiki-do building.

The former analog era is changing over to a digital era, and humanity is currently at a major transition stage in this progress. I would like to continue my efforts to investigate what it is that can be communicated through still and moving images.

Feedback on having used 18-270mm (Model B008)

I spent approximately four weeks in the disaster region of the Great East Japan Earthquake, traveling about 300 to 400 kilometers a day. Under such harsh circumstances, I had to keep my equipment to a bare minimum. The compact, lightweight, and sharp Model B008 really helped me in that period.

Search from an alphabetical list

Removing Debris
from the Rice
Fields
(Rikuzentakata,
June 25, 2011)

pg01

Next

close

Tokyo Sky Tree and
Construction Crane
(July 2011)

pg02

Prev.

Next

close

One Pine Tree (Rikuzentakata, June 25, 2011)

pg03

Prev.

Next

close

Restricted Area (Minamisoma, June 19, 2011)

pg04

Prev.

Next

close

Nishitanibo at Chuson-ji, a World Heritage Site (June 26, 2011)

pg05

Prev.

close

Search from an alphabetical list

close

close